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  • Giselle Smith

FAB FEMALE PROFESSIONALS: The Coolest Creatives

Last but not least, today we have The Coolest Creatives. This bunch of women are more fun than a barrel of monkeys and always seem to inspire the local market. I am so proud to work alongside these ladies. If you have made it through all five blog posts, you're a rockstar, and we appreciate you more than we can express! In case you have missed what we're up to: This is the last post of our Q&A-style feature, Fab Female Professionals of Hardin County. Each of the 72 lovely ladies answered up to 10 questions about her business or profession, giving insight as to what it means to be a female professional and sharing a bit on how they give back to the area. Featured in print is one answer from each lady, but the full questionnaires are available on our blog, RIGHT HERE. Check out the Blog tab on our website for other answers. Photos by an extra cool creative herself, Elaina Janes Photography. Photo of Elaina taken by Stephanie Hardwick Photography.


Elaina Janes, Elaina Janes Photography

What made you decide to become a photographer? I started this business by complete accident. I was always into art through school and curious about photography but knew nothing about it until a friend on Facebook posted a camera for sale, and I bought it. I was at a time in my life where I was looking for a new hobby, something to do after work. I picked it up, and I couldn't put it down. I took pictures walking the dog, posted a lot of absolutely horrible photos on the internet I was really proud of - and then people started messaging me to take their family photos. And I did, lots and lots of horrible photos. I mean CRINGE WORTHY, but I was having so much fun. A year later, I was doing 150 sessions a year and quit my day job, scared to death. That was nearly ten years ago! How did you get started in your profession? Truly by following my curiosity. Photography was never my dream; it was never at the forefront. And now, I couldn't imagine doing anything else. If you asked me my actual dream job, I would have answered something along the lines of Indiana Jones for most of my life. And while I still definitely kind of want to do that, photography feels like home to me, it gets my heart beating in a way no other profession or job ever has.

How many years have you been in business/worked at your job? I picked up a camera in 2010 and quit my "day job I went to college for" in 2011. I've never looked back since! In 2017, my husband was able to quit his job and now works with me, so this is our sole income. Woot Woot! What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out? Art is personal. So, my goal in my business is that they are hiring me as a person and for the way I make them feel - and you really can't get more unique than that. What do you love most about your job? I get to be a part of people's most important moments with the people they love most. I get to welcome new life, watch new chapters unfold, children growing and playing, sometimes I even get to help families say goodbye. My entire career is supported and encouraged by love. Are there any unique challenges you have faced as a female in the photography industry? How do you overcome those? Honestly, I think the photography community is pretty diverse, even female-dominated. Any adversity I had to overcome was being taken seriously in starting a business. Will this work, have you thought this through? Are you sure? Are you good enough, are you capable? It takes time, but I think it takes more time for a woman to establish this respect. But when you start to value and respect yourself and your time, soon others will too. How does your job help local ladies? I am an encouraging type. I want you to have some pep in your step after we've hung out. I want you to KNOW how amazing you are. I hope I make women feel beautiful, strong, and confident. It takes a lot of vulnerability to get in front of the camera, and I always want to show them how wonderful that is. If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

Girlfriend, the way you see the world is beautiful. Show us that! Don't worry about what everyone else is doing. While it's vulnerable to be photographed, it's also vulnerable to put your work out there, and don't let fear stop you. DO IT! Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work? "Bitches get stuff done." - Tina Fey "You weren't born to just pay bills and die." - unknown


https://elainajanes.com/connect/

https://www.facebook.com/elainajanesphoto

https://www.instagram.com/elainajanes/


GIselle Smith, Elizabethtown Lifestyle Magazine


Why a magazine?

I’m asked this almost every time I come in contact with someone new in the community. Elizabethtown Lifestyle combines my passion for marketing and working with small businesses, and my deep-seated background in events. When I moved here from Texas, it took literal years to find everything I needed. ETown is full of hidden gems, and our mission is to showcase the very best that Hardin County has to offer. Launch parties are near and dear to my heart, as I truly love bringing people together.


How did I get started in the profession?

Event planning and floral design have taken precedence in my life since 2011, mainly in Texas although I began traveling to weddings across the U.S. in 2017 when I moved to Kentucky. In 2016, I launched a bridal magazine in Waco, Texas, with two of my close friends, a venue owner/baker and a luxury stationery designer. In case you're curious: No, I have not met Joanna Gaines; yes, I have been to the Magnolia Silos a dozen or so times. We sold that magazine to one of my dear friends, an event planner, just before I got married and became a permanent Kentucky resident in fall of 2018. Shortly after getting married, I began considering a local magazine here. I knew that I would be taking a year or so off from events to have a baby (Henry, my sidekick, as shown above), and I'm not the type to sit still. The time was right, and I'm so glad we made the investment.


How many years have you been in the business/worked at your job?

APRIL 3 WAS OUR ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY! Our first magazine did not launch until October 15, 2019, but we began work on the publication last spring. Overall I have been publishing magazines for nearly four years. Crazy how time flies.


What sets your business apart from others like it in the area?

There actually are no others like it in the area. We are the only quarterly local magazine in Hardin County. While ads are for sale, thus far, the magazine has not been a for-profit business; everything that comes in we put back. Our focus is enhancing the community through showcasing everything Hardin County has to offer from businesses to events.


How does it stand out? 

It's pretty and printed on high quality paper. All of our photos are professional; I think that definitely makes a difference. I am very fortunate to work with some of the best photographers in the area.


What do you love most about your job? 

Launch parties are my favorite. I LOVE EVENTS. As soon as things open up, expect to see invites for launch parties for upcoming issues as well as some charity events benefitting local organizations. Photo shoots are my second favorite; styling is my thing. While I love graphic design, deadlines and getting content turned in has been my biggest challenge thus far.


Are there any special challenges you have faced as a female business owner? How do you overcome those?

In general, society has come so far since in the 1950s when women were primarily housewives. Being taken seriously is probably the one hurdle that I experienced early on with the magazine here; doubts came from both women and men. I will be forever grateful for those who signed on with the magazine before there was an actual magazine. The majority of my life I have worked mainly with strong, female business owners. I really try to embrace being a chick. While I have a more masculine approach to design and I am very straightforward, we women have a certain way of looking at things, a different vision than a man would have.


How does your job help local ladies?

We feature local ladies all the time. Elizabethtown Lifestyle is geared towards women. Somethingt that benedfits everyone: We use the magazinea s a platform to showcase the very best that Hardin County has to offer and to promote local events. The more cool things that happen/exist, the more cool things there will be. A publication has the ability to showcase the very best locally, and once people see what is possible, they will naturally build on that. Cliche but true: "Success breeds success" and "We rise by lifting others."


If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

YOU CAN DO IT! No, really, you can. You can do whatever you set your mind to if you're willing to work hard and show up every day. I probably would recommend charging a lot more for ads and something for features in order to take home a paycheck, lol.


Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work, what would it be?

I think most who know me, ”Make it a great day!" Simple, but empowering that you have the power to do just that. What making it a great day means to one is likely different from another, but as long as you own it, the choice is yours!


If you a mother with children living at home, how do you balance work and motherhood? If you have adult children and worked while they were growing up, give one piece of advice for working mothers now.

I will be the first to admit that much of my life I put work before all else. I am not the best at balance and regularly fail at parenting. My children are fed, clothed, and make it to school usually on time. Kenzie, my near-sixteen-year-old daughter, is responsible, hilarious and enjoyable to be around although I don't think I can take credit; she was born that way. She naturally picks up the slack and is very independent although rebellious. I am curious to see what she accomplishes in life and hope I have set an example of kindness (despite my inability to sugarcoat things) and hard work. Henry is brand new; I am putting in a very real effort o spend time with him at home.


https://www.elizabethtownlifestyle.com

https://www.lovelyleavesweddings.com

https://www.facebook.com/ElizabethtownLifestyle/

https://www.instagram.com/_giselle_smith/

https://www.instagram.com/elizabethtownlifestyle/


Danelle Fogle, Elizabethtown Florist


What made you decide to become a photographer? How did you get started in your profession? How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

It all got started 12 years ago when my husband and I got engaged. We knew the look we wanted, however, didn’t have the budget for it. Coincidentally, my best friend's mother owned her own florist shop and told us we could buy the flowers through her distributors. So we decided to get creative, and with her instruction, I embarked on making the arrangements myself. So for three days, with all of my friends and husband, we worked together to make all of the centerpieces and bouquets for our wedding. That is when I fell in love with the florist industry and found that I had a natural ability. After that, as my friends got married, I started doing their weddings. When we had our firstborn, I became a stay a home mom, and that’s when I decided to start my own company. After several years of frustrating my husband with flowers all over the house, one night, it was posted online that Elizabethtown Florist was for sale, and we immediately called the owner.

What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? What sets our business apart is the history. Etown Florist has always been a family-owned and operated small business since 1947. Several of the employees have been with the company for over 20 years, and family lineages, including grandmothers, mothers, and now daughters, have used Etown Florist for their weddings and special events. Etown Florist has been known as a community partner, providing flowers for corporate events, weddings, funerals, and especially Valentine's Day. We believe that our customer service is ultimately what sets us apart. With our experience and infrastructure, we can provide beautiful arrangements for all events; however, still small enough to know our customers.

What do you love most about your job? What I love most about my job is seeing my boys playing around in the shop. We are a family-owned business, and a lot of our time together is spent in the shop or running deliveries together on the weekends. One special thing we get to do as a family is to take arrangements from a prior nights event to a local senior living community the next day. Another reason I love my job is how it provides us the ability to give back to the community. Each year we provide decorations and floral arrangements for charitable fundraisers, including Hosparus, Kosair’s, Purses Pumps & Prevention, CASA, and Kiwanis, to name a few.

How does your job help local ladies? By brightening a lady's day.

If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? If I had one piece of advice, it would be that this job is not for the weary. As a florist, you celebrate people’s love for one another, and also help families mourn for those they recently lost. It is very rewarding and very humbling at the same time.

Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work? “Every rose has its thorn” Poison 1988


https://www.etownflorist.net

https://www.facebook.com/etownflorist/

https://www.instagram.com/etownflorist/


Morgan Worley, Morgan WOrley Photography


What made you decide to become a photographer?

Believe it or not, I took my now husband’s high school senior pictures when I was 15! It has been something I have loved for a long time.


How did you get started in your profession?

I was actually in college studying to be on a completely different career path when my side hustle as a photographer started. It was doing so well by my college graduation that I abandoned by other career aspirations to become a full-time photographer.

How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

Coming up on eight years!

What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

I think there are so many wonderful photographers in the area, but we all have a unique editing style with my own style being very light and bright! I also love doing lifestyle photos in my clients’ homes instead of in a studio setting!

What do you love most about your job?

I love that each day is different! One day I may be shooting a wedding, the next, a newborn, and the day after that, a real estate listing!

Are there any special challenges you have faced as a female in the photography industry? How do you overcome those?

I think for the most part in our area, women are dominating the photography field, and I love to see that! How does your job help local ladies?

Most of my clients are newly engaged brides, new or expecting mothers, or moms/grandmas wishing for beautiful memories of their family. Although my job seems simple, there is so much more behind the scenes like helping an overwhelmed bride navigate the world of wedding planning or choosing the perfect poses and angles to help a woman feel confident and gorgeous during her session! If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

Start off on the right foot by setting up your business legally. Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work? "Never give up on something that you can't go a day without thinking about." Winston Churchill OR "We won’t be distracted by comparison if we are captivated with purpose."Bob Goff

If you are a mother with children living at home, how do you balance work and motherhood? If you have adult children and worked while they were growing up, give one piece of advice for working mothers now. I have a busy, busy toddler at home, so the majority of my computer work (editing, emails, uploading client galleries, etc.) happens during nap and bedtimes. I am very blessed in the fact that my job allows me the flexibility of getting to stay home with him while still doing what I love!


https://www.morganworley.com

https://www.facebook.com/morganworleyphotography

https://www.instagram.com/morganworleyphotography/

https://www.instagram.com/houseofworley/


Jenn Bays, Success Beyond the Lens

What made you decide to become a freelancer?

I wanted to be in control of my own schedule with the ability to be home with my baby. I knew I had the skills to be successful; it was just a matter of figuring out the "how" behind it. 


How did you get started in your profession?

I took a course on how to be a virtual assistant and then grew my position and expertise from there. I had several years of corporate experience in logistics and relationships that translated well.


How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

I just started my third year in business.


What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

What sets me apart is that I care for my clients’ businesses as much as I do my own business. I am invested in the success of my clients; it’s not just a paycheck for me. I get to know my clients, what they love, what inspires them, what their goals are, in order to help strategize and motivate them while we work together. I’m their accountability partner, marketing strategist, and business manager, all wrapped into one.


What do you love most about your job?

I love that I have the ability to make a difference in the lives and businesses of my clients while being there for my family in a way that aligns with my values. I give 100% of myself when I'm working with my clients while maintaining boundaries that allow me to be 100% with my family during my off-hours. 


How does your job help local ladies?

For the local ladies, I can help create more time and freedom in your work and home life by taking over everyday tasks that you don't like doing or don't have time to do. From marketing online through building and loving on your email list, to creating and executing social media strategies, or streamlining your processes for repetitive tasks, my company is all about optimizing your day to day operations.


If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

Be brave. You don't get in life what you don't ask for. Be open to learning. Every single client and mentor I've had has taught me something new that has improved my business and how I conduct business with my clients. Having an open mind and being able to listen has been incredibly beneficial to our growth.


Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work?

"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams." Eleanor Roosevelt 


https://successbeyondthelens.com/

https://www.facebook.com/jennbays/

https://www.instagram.com/successbeyondthelens/


Kaila Mulhall Simpson, Something Borrowed Event Rentals & Party Store


What made you decide to open a rental company? I’ve always dreamt of owning my own business like my dad did. I wanted to challenge myself more and put my own ideas and hard work to the test. Self-employment has done that, and thankfully I’ve seen a positive outcome. How did you get started in your profession?

Our business came to life when Wayne and I rented a tent for our own wedding. We were disappointed with the equipment and customer service we received. After doing a lot of research, we decided it was a business we wanted to try. How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

We’ve done rentals for almost three years now, and the party supplies a few months. What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

Something Borrowed is the only Tent Rental business in the Hardin County area. The next closest is in Louisville. We travel all over central Kentucky. What do you love most about your job?

I love seeing our clients' faces after we get these large pole tents up in the air; they are often taken back by how large and grand it looks. It stirs excitement in them that their event is finally happening after sometimes an entire year of planning. It’s fun to see and makes us feel fulfilled that the work we’re doing is good. Are there any special challenges you have faced as a female in the event industry? How do you overcome those? Women primarily run the event business, but men primarily run the tent rental business. Having the right tools and equipment to lift these massive tents in the air has helped us stay competitive. How does your job help local ladies?

90% of the time in my experience, it's women planning the events; even with weddings, it’s usually mothers and the bride. I hope that I can make their events a little less stressful by being available and responsive to their questions.

If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? Don’t let anyone intimidate you and make you think you can’t do it. Do your research and gain all the knowledge you can about the field so you can speak and run your business with confidence. Make friends with people in the same industry so you can bounce ideas off each other. In the event industry, most people work together, even competing businesses. Everyone wins this way.

If you are a mother with children living at home, how do you balance work and motherhood? If you have adult children and worked while they were growing up, give one piece of advice for working mothers now. I have two children, 1 and 5. There is no great answer for balancing work and home. I feel guilty if I’m not doing something for work as I should be, and I also feel very guilty if I’m working and not spending time with my kids. Just make sure you always make time for both and don’t ever try to mix the two. If you’re having a family day, keep your phone in your pocket and be present in the moment with them. I try to do homework at night after they’ve gone to bed. It’s a process that will always need a little adjusting as they get older and their needs change.

https://www.somethingborrowedky.com

https://www.facebook.com/SomethingBorrowedky/

https://www.instagram.com/somethingborrwed_event_rentals/


Courtney Ballard, HIP South


What made you decide to become an artist?

It honestly wasn’t always what I dreamed of doing. I saw my creativity as something that I was good at and would have in life as a hobby but could never pursue as a career. Ultimately, I knew my love for art and design would always be bigger than any other interest or passion in my life, so I switched my college major from biology to fine arts and never looked back.


How did you get started in your profession?

I worked as a graphic designer initially, but after having my oldest son, I began freelancing and working from home, which meant moving my focus from graphic art to fine art. I painted anything and everything... murals, lampshades, canvases, picture frames, furniture. I loved the creative freedom that my clients were kind enough to give me and learned so much from saying yes to projects that I’d never imagined for myself.


How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

I’ve been an artist and designer for over twenty years and opened my studio four years ago.


What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

All artists have their own style, their own voice and aesthetic. I’d like to think that my work stands apart from others because it’s comes from my personal point of view: What inspires me, what makes me happy, what I want to explore creatively.


What do you love most about your job?

I’m not sure that I could choose just one favorite thing because there are so many parts that I love. At the top of my list would, for sure, be the community. Using art as a tool to connect with people and support others is truly the best.


Are there any unique challenges you have faced as a female in the creative industry? How do you overcome those?

I can’t say for sure if my line of work is male-dominated or not. My guess would be yes. I’m sure some female artists struggle with being taken seriously, being given opportunities, and being paid what they’re worth just like any other female professional. I try to let my work speak for itself and always hope that it has a voice much louder than any label or stereotype.


How does your job help local ladies?

I’ve had the pleasure of working with some amazing women in our community who have needed creative help in making their businesses shine through brand and logo development. Collaborating with women in any capacity is always such an honor...and lots of fun.


If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

Have faith in the process, confidence in your ideas, and just. keep. working.


Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work?

Stay positive, be kind, work hard, make it happen.


https://courtneyballard.co

https://www.facebook.com/HIP-South-145297395511024/

https://www.instagram.com/hipsouth/

https://www.instagram.com/cballard123/


Lisa Hamrick, Color Me Mod Flower Farm


What made you decide to become a flower farmer?

In 2015, I worked with a life coach who helped me to recognize and articulate my values. Flower farming combines my love of nature and the environment and provides endless opportunities for my photography!

How did you get started in your profession?

While the majority of what I know comes from being self-taught, I have also tapped into the Facebook Flower Farmer group. This is a fantastic bunch of like-minded farmers who are incredibly generous with their knowledge and experience.

How many years have you been in business/worked at your job?

I began farming in 2016 and moved my farm to its current location in 2018.

What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

I specialize in growing vibrant, uncommon, textural, and seasonal flowers and foliage. In addition, a portion of my property is dedicated to pollinator habitat, which includes a certified Monarch Butterfly Way station.

What do you love most about your job?

I love every single aspect of being a flower farmer – especially knowing that the seed that I planted, babied and fussed over, produced an amazing bloom. Equally gratifying is seeing the reactions of people when they receive my flowers!

Are there any unique challenges you have faced as a female in the agriculture industry? How do you overcome those?

Because I am growing a non-traditional crop, I have had many businesses dismiss me as if I am growing flowers as a hobby rather than a business. This means that I have to assert myself a little more often and have my documentation handy, showing that I am an operational farm with tax-exempt status.

How does your job help local ladies?

Since I have been the recipient of other flower farmers’ time and knowledge, it’s important for me to be sure I can be a resource to anyone wanting to grow cut flowers or establish pollinator habitats in my community. I will also be teaching classes later this summer at Whitehall Gardens in Louisville.

If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be?

While no one wants to kill anything, the best way to learn is simply by doing. Dream big, throw caution to the wind and plant some seeds in the ground!

https://www.colormemodflowerfarm.com/

https://www.facebook.com/Colormemod

https://www.instagram.com/colormemodflowerfarm/


Marnie Clagett, Clagett Photography


What made you decide to become a photographer? After my children were born, I left the entertainment industry to be a stay-at-home mom. Painting and photography became my creative outlets when the kids were young, so when I was ready to go back to work, photography was the perfect fit. How did you get started in your profession? I fell in love with photography in my high school journalism class. I still remember spending time in the darkroom at EHS, developing film and making prints. I had already decided to go into theatre, though, so working as a professional photographer wasn’t even on my radar at the time. It wasn’t until a friend in an oil painting class asked me to photograph her grandson that I realized I might be able to make a living at this. How many years have you been in business/worked at your job? Just over ten years. What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out? We are a fine art photography studio, so we are focused on creating wall art installations and albums for our clients. I’m part photographer, part interior designer. I believe that my job is to not just make pretty images for my clients to show friends on social media but to create artwork for their home that they can see and touch every day. I’m there to guide my clients through every step in the process—from the first consultation to the moment I hang their finished products on their walls. What do you love most about your job? We have some of the most amazing folks on the planet who come through our studio. And because of our studio’s process, I get to spend a little extra time with each one of them, learning who they are and what they love most about the people they do life with. They inspire me to be a better human being on a daily basis. Are there any unique challenges you have faced as a female in the photography industry? How do you overcome those? The photography industry has more women in it today than ever before, thanks in large part to the advent of the digital camera and a lower financial barrier of entry into the industry. There are, however, still strides to be made for women in photography. I teach business strategies to photographers and am surprised at how often I’m condescended to by some men before classes—I’ve even had men interrupt my class to explain something that I’m leading up to teaching. I’ve learned that the only thing to do is confidently teach what I know—that usually is plenty to change those attitudes. How does your job help local ladies? Every portrait session we photograph helps our community in some way. We donate $50 from each session to Feeding America and $100 from every wedding to Children Incorporated, and we frequently donate gift certificates to fundraisers in our area. All of these organizations are serving women and families. In the past five years, our little studio has donated almost $13,000 in cash to non-profits. (We haven’t counted how much we’ve donated in gift certificates to our community.)

If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? Learn the business side of owning a photography studio. So many women get into the photography industry and quickly find themselves burned out because they’re working themselves to death and showing very little profit for all their efforts. Join your local Professional Photographers affiliate (in Kentucky, it’s the PhotoPro Network) and get involved. Being with other professionals—hanging out with them, learning with and from them in person--is one of the best things I do for my business. Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work? “It’s not enough to have lived. We should be determined to live for something. May I suggest that it be creating joy for others, sharing what we have for the betterment of person kind, bringing hope to the lost and love to the lonely.” Leo F. Buscaglia


https://www.clagettphotography.com

https://www.facebook.com/clagettphotography

https://www.instagram.com/clagettphotography/



Olivia Guandique & Catherine Greenwell, Denizen


What made you decide to become a business owner? 

Olivia: Watching my father own his own business has always been something that has inspired me from a young age. Because of that, I was never afraid to go for it because it's been something so normal to Catherine and me. 

How did you get started in your profession? 

Olivia: My background and degree is in Merchandising. I lived and studied in New York City for 2.5 years, where I merchandised for several high fashion companies. After leaving New York City, I got the opportunity to open a brand new Urban Outfitters retail store in Lexington, Kentucky. There I was the store manager and store merchandiser. After a few years, I wanted a break from working with apparel, and find something I could have even more creative freedom in. I then found a merchandising job for a home decor and furniture company where I traveled 50% of the year. When I decided to have a baby, I knew I didn’t want to travel for work with a baby… So, now what will I do?! Cue, Denizen! Retail has been the only job I know, thus opening a storefront felt very natural. 

How many years have you been in business/worked at your job? 

I've worked in the retail world for 12 years, and Denizen will be 3 in October. 

What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? How does it stand out?

Olivia: We opened Denizen because we couldn’t find our style of products anywhere in Elizabethtown, so why not bring them here ourselves! I think if you come in our shop, you will see that we, without a doubt, are different from the other shops in our area. Our goal is to have 70% of the product we sell be a small business/maker. We truly believe in knowing where and who our products come from. When you shop with us, you are also supporting another amazing small business that we personally know their stories!! Selling products that we handpick and spend hours/days sourcing is something we have so much pride in. 

What do you love most about your job? 

Olivia: Working with my sister everyday and watching my daughter grow up in our shop makes my heart very happy. 

Catherine: The opportunity to impact our community and the world through our dollars spent is by far the most rewarding part of my work. We get to make decisions every hour that allow us the chance to change the world as we know it, just through intentional spending and decision-making. 

Are there any special challenges you have faced as a female business owner? How do you overcome those?

Olivia: I think in any business world, women struggle with not being taken seriously. It makes it even harder when you are not only a female but a female in your 20s. Catherine and I have both found that because we are young, we are talked down too often from older males in the business world. It is frustrating, and in the beginning, it would really fire me up! But now I think to myself, “We are the next generation to improve this city. If we are in our 20s doing this, what can we achieve in our 40s, 60s? We will work hard to not only be great business owners but great friends to the people in this community. And if they don't take us seriously, our success and connections with others will speak for themselves.” 

How does your job help local ladies?

Catherine: Denizen is a proud supporter of makers and artists locally and around the globe! We strive to support the endeavors of women by stocking their products and getting it into the hands of our customers, furthering their reach and their opportunity to grow!


If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? 

Olivia: Be willing to work HARD, and don’t be afraid to do something you’ve never done before! Try and have some fun while you're at it. And make friends with people that constantly inspire and challenge you-they make you better. 

Catherine: Piece of advice - Focus on building relationships as much as you focus on growing your business. The two go hand in hand, yet the relationships will return far greater happiness and satisfaction than money ever will! 

Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work?

Olivia “Some women are lost in the fire. Some women are built from it.” ― Michelle K.


https://www.shopdenizen.com/shop

https://www.facebook.com/denizenelizabethtown/

https://www.instagram.com/shopdenizen/


Renee Peace, Thurman Landing

What made you decide to become an Event Coordinator? I love people and enjoy helping to create something beautiful from just an idea or a thought. How did you get started in your profession? I've been working with the public for most of my life. I was pulling together functions for my employers, church, and civic groups as needed. I became friends with Claudia through the Merchants Association, working on our festival and holiday functions. It seemed only natural to help Charlie get everything back up and running. I'm glad that I did. How many years have you been in business/worked at your job? Thurman Landing started out as Claudia's Tea Room and Thurman-Phillips Guest Home around 2004. I began working with Charles in the fall of 2014. What sets your business apart from others like it in the area? At Thurman Landing, we offer everything in one place. We are centrally located in the heart of Kentucky, just off the interstate for easy access, a beautiful venue, guest homes for your family and friends, full-service catering and a staff that will work together to make your event special. How does it stand out? The park area, lake, pavilion, gazebo, and courtyard offer many options for an outdoor event, while we also have our party room, tea room, and event barn e(which has heat and air) for indoor events. Claudia's catering staff provides made-from-scratch, real home cooking, and will work with you to create the perfect menu for your event. What do you love most about your job? The best part of working at Thurman Landing would have to be the many people I come in contact with. Whether you are a couple planning your wedding, a family setting up a weekend reunion, or a cross country cyclist from Australia spending the night at the guest house, the variety of people and places are incredible. How does your job help local ladies? I believe I set the example that you are never too old to start your second act (or 4th act in my case). We put so much pressure on young people to figure out what they want to do early in life and create a career. Why not help our young people to create their best life in knowing that if we start out on one path, it's okay to change directions and do something different. Life is short, and it's not good to live it in a career that you hate. If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? Find a mentor and work with them for a while. Learn all you can from them, AND Always give credit where it's due. Praise a job well done. A good leader works right alongside their team. Never ask them to do anything that you wouldn't do as well. Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work? "In the end, it's not the years in your life that counts, but the life in your years." - Abraham Lincoln https://thurmanlanding.com

https://www.facebook.com/thurmanlanding/

https://www.instagram.com/claudiastearoom/


Hollie Sexton & Megan Stith, Boss Lady Coaching & Podcast


What made you decide to start Boss Lady Coaching? 

Hollie: We have a voice and something to say. Thanks to technology, everyone can speak up for themselves and share information that educates and empowers others to achieve their goals.

Megan: Throughout my career, I have had the opportunity to work with women and young professionals from various backgrounds, often as they found themselves at a crossroads in their personal lives or careers. I wanted to be a better colleague and underwent professional coaching training to help those around me reach their fullest potential. After working with a variety of clients, Hollie Sexton shared the idea of starting a podcast to expand the reach of the encouraging messages I shared as a coach. 


How did you get started? 

Hollie: When I was fifteen, I applied for a part-time position at a radio station. When I started in broadcasting, stations were using Associated Press wire for news, phasing out eight tracks and playing CDs. It was an exciting time to be in broadcasting due to the transition from live radio to automation. I have had the good fortune to experience and be trained during dramatic shifts in technology in the broadcasting industry. Now EVERYONE is podcasting. It’s an exciting time to be in the podcast industry!

Megan:I had experience in marketing but had never been on the producing side of broadcasting before! I'm lucky to work with Hollie since she had the technical skills needed for a podcast to be successful, and we both had a network of relationships with women whose stories would inspire others. We got started simply by asking others to learn and grow with us! This aligned perfectly with my career in philanthropy, which allows me to make a difference in our community by helping donors achieve their goals. I never imagined I would be part of such transformative work like this, but it is a blessing to see people come together to make a positive impact!


How many years have you been in business/worked at your job? 

Hollie: I have over 20 years of experience in broadcasting and three years of experience podcasting.

Megan: I have worked in the philanthropic sector since 2011, and the Boss Lady Coaching Podcast was born in 2017. 


What sets the Boss Lady Coaching Podcast apart from other podcasts?

Hollie: There are SO many entertaining and informative podcasts on iTunes, Soundcloud, etc. and I am a podcast addict. What sets our podcast apart from others is that it is Kentucky-centric and focused on the whole woman – career, professional development, physical-mental-emotional-health, relationships, parenting. We are so fortunate to have a community full of intelligent, driven, and compassionate women who make an impact in their workplaces, communities, and homes.

Megan: Because Hollie and I work full-time in addition to Boss Lady Coaching, we can be selective about the projects we take on. This means the work we do is incredibly meaningful to us like the She Started It entrepreneurship event we've held for two years in partnership with Hardin County and Elizabethtown Independent Schools. We also enjoy collaborating with other women-owned businesses or showcasing the talents of women who are new to the area. I hope we're developing a reputation for being a destination for good ideas, as we'll do whatever we can to help others succeed!


What do you love most about the podcast?

Hollie: My favorite part of recording the podcast is the moment when Megan and I make a meaningful connection with the guest. Sometimes we laugh together, or our connection comes through tears. There is something special about taking off the masks we wear, the labels others give us, our beliefs – the moment when we are vulnerable humans on this crazy exciting adventure together. We may not agree with the views of our guests, and we may not connect after the podcast, but there’s a moment in every recording session where we are simply friends having a conversation that can encourage or help the listener.

Megan: It is humbling to have the opportunity to build relationships with women who are passionate about changing the world in their own unique ways. We have had so many raw and challenging conversations on the Boss Lady Coaching Podcast, including topics of faith, fear, pregnancy loss, body image, building businesses, and parenting. Our guests come from all walks of life, and yet they are all bound by a commitment to taking risks. Being surrounded by women who make it a habit to push themselves out of their comfort zones is inspiring to me too, and their influence and mentorship have changed my life.


Are there any special challenges you have faced as a female in the podcast industry? How do you overcome those?

Hollie: Broadcasting is historically a male-dominated field, have you had to overcome gender-related obstacles with your podcast? Absolutely! Anytime a person creates something or puts themselves out in public, they will be criticized, and women are judged more harshly than our counterparts when it comes to innovation. Some people think the name Boss Lady is offensive to women. I employ the phrase “Boss Lady” in the same way Tina Fey uses it in her New York Times bestselling book, Bossy Pants. Not everyone will get that it’s lighthearted, fun, and tongue-in-cheek. That’s okay, Boss Ladies can’t make everyone happy, and I’m cool with that.

Megan: I'm sure we've all heard of the adage "it's not what you know, it's who you know." Many of us have watched men advance in their careers through networking, with business deals done on the golf course, or over drinks at happy hour. But where is the space for women to develop and leverage their relationships? That was the environment Hollie, and I wanted to create through our podcast, social media community, and events. Research shows mentorship is incredibly important to women's' success, so everything we do focuses on helping women build meaningful connections. 


How does the podcast help local ladies? 

Hollie: The Boss Lady Coaching Podcast is available for free on iTunes and Sound Cloud. Along with interviewing local women of influence, we also host enrichment and entrepreneurial events for middle school girls in our community. Megan also created a platform on Facebook called the Boss Lady Network. If there’s a career opportunity, project, or someone reaches out to us for help, 99% of the time, we know a gal who is a subject matter expert that can step in and provide assistance. We love creating connections!

Megan: We give women a platform to share their stories, as well as a safe place to have vulnerable conversations about the challenges and struggles we all face. Sometimes it's easy to look at someone else's success and not realize the obstacles they had to overcome. We like to talk about the work done behind the scenes, which was critical to success but not as visible. We help our guests build their own networks of influence while having meaningful, relatable conversations that encourage women to take ownership of their lives. It's amazing to watch many of our guests go on to develop friendships or business partnerships with each other!


If you had one piece of advice for women entering your line of work, what would it be? 

Hollie: Spend some time thinking about your passion. An enrichment podcast entails juggling schedules and hours of research. Sustaining a podcast is work. It’s fun when we are sitting with guests and recording, but it’s preparation before the podcast and production after. If you are not passionate about the podcast theme, it is unsustainable. Podcasting consistently is a discipline.

Megan: Don't wait to be invited; pull up your own seat to the table. We're part of a culture where everyone has ideas and opinions, but few develop the habits and discipline needed to take action. Surround yourself with people who will hold you accountable and push you to keep moving forward. It's natural to want to wait until you're an expert or until you have a perfect product, but you won't improve without practice. The goal is to make progress, so get out there and start doing!


Is there a quote that makes you feel empowered or pertains to your line of work?

Hollie: “The Future belongs to the Doers!” An article online by Dereck Tafuma describes how I think about bravery and innovation. When I see someone trying something new, I am so proud inside for them. It takes guts to try. 

Megan: "Stay afraid, but do it anyway. What's important is the action. You don't have to wait to be confident. Just do it, and eventually, the confidence will follow." -Carrie Fisher


https://www.bethebosscoaching.com

https://www.facebook.com/bethebosscoaching/

https://www.instagram.com/bossladycoaching/


Do you support local creatives? Glad to hear it! Head over to these ladies' social media pages and give them a follow. Tag us when visiting their businesses and use the hashtag #elizabethtownlifestyle. If you don't already, check us out on Facebook and Instagram to stay up-to-date on the latest happenings with Elizabethtown Lifestyle and local community events.


Thanks so much for following along with the Fab Female Professionals!! Stay tuned for more posts showcasing the best Hardin County has to offer.




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